Strengthening capacity for health policy systems research in Nigeria

Strengthening capacity for health policy systems research in Nigeria

The convening will be a 2-day virtual participant-driven unconference

Strengthening capacity for health policy systems research in Nigeria

Slide showing the title and sponsors of the convening

Health Policy Systems Research (HPSR) is still relatively new and evolving in Nigeria, but is already regarded as a priority research need, having been included in the National Strategic Health development Plan as one of the eight priority areas that aim to utilize research to inform policy and programs, improve health and contribute to the global knowledge platform. Currently, there is limited use of research findings by policymakers and communities, which is partly explained by inadequate and insufficient capacity to produce and use HPSR. With the growing interest from government, civil society, and international organizations, the challenge now lies in meaningfully engaging key audiences – government, private sector players, academia and media – to share insights, collaborate and problem-solve together to drive policy and bring HPSR (and research in general) outcomes forward.

To engage and connect key audiences to share insights, collaborate, and problem-solve together to drive improved and strengthened capacities for HPSR leadership in Nigeria. The convening also afforded the opportunity to identify gaps, opportunities, advocacy strategies/tools, and relevant stakeholders for increasing participatory leadership for HPSR at national and sub-national levels in Nigeria.

The convening was a 2-day virtual participant-driven unconference that combined different formats to enable effective participation and interrogation of issues. Formats included plenary sessions, with attendant breakout sessions, panel discussions led by seasoned practitioners, academics, and policymakers vast in the field of HPSR with adequate Question and Answer sessions after each panel discussion.

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Image: Lindsay Mgbor/Department for International Development/Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0