Decolonial thought and African consciousness for socially just health systems: An imaginative space

Decolonial thought and African consciousness for socially just health systems: An imaginative space

Decolonial thought and African consciousness for socially just health systems: An imaginative space

Globally, decoloniality requires researchers and practitioners located in Africa to build and develop collective capacities and knowledge archives that centres Africa and African people. This convening foregrounds Africans as experts, and provides us with an opportunity to highlight our own solutions to the challenges faced on the African continent. It seeks to dView posto that in the area of African Health Policy and Systems Research (HPSR) by making space for scholars and practitioners to build collective capacity to engage in critical decolonial scholarship with the aim of envisioning socially just health systems on the continent.

While the importance of decolonial perspectives linked to HPSR and global health has emerged in conversations in these fields, much of these discussions and ideas have been concentrated in well-resourced Global North institutions. To counter this, this convening is provided as a space for an African conversation that will begin to build solidarity across countries, regions and contexts, breaking down colonially-imposed divides to reorient African knowledge, realities and people, lifting these up as valuable and legitimate knowledge bearers able to shape the field on the continent and beyond. This includes making space for difficult conversations about power and hegemonic epistemologies and the impacts of these to the profession and to personhood. As African HPSR and decolonial scholars in particular, this convening will explore the possibilities of a knowledge paradigm that frames decolonial research in HPSR, drawing explicitly on decolonial theories and approaches which includes anti-racist, critical race, black consciousness, queer and African feminists’ perspectives.

Find out more and follow the conversation

Image: Barbara Jones Hogu