Mentors

Meet the Mentors who are taking part in the HSG Women Mentorship program

Sharon Low

Sharon Low

Public Health Practitioner/Researcher

Lyn Macarayan

Lyn Macarayan

Harvard University, Health Systems Global

Robert Marten

Robert Marten

Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research, World Health Organization

Ligia Paina

Ligia Paina

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

Kerry Scott

Kerry Scott

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Independent researcher

Seye Abimbola

Seye Abimbola

University of Sydney School of Public Health

Lal B. Rawal

Lal B. Rawal

Central Queensland University

Salla Atkins

Salla Atkins

Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University and Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet

Katrina Hann

Katrina Hann

Sustainable Health Systems, Sierra Leone

Judith Daire

Judith Daire

Curtin University, School of Public Health

Nasreen Jessani

Nasreen Jessani

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Stellenbosch University Centre for Evidence-Based Health Care and Africa Centre for Evidence at University of Johannesburg

Edna Nyanchama Bosire

Edna Nyanchama Bosire

Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit (DPHRU), School of Clinical Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand

Karen Grepin

Karen Grepin

University of Hong Kong

Mohammed Alkhaldi

Mohammed Alkhaldi

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Council on Health Research for Development and McGill University

Lisa Hirschhorn

Lisa Hirschhorn

Northwestern University Feinberg Medical School

Steph Topp

Steph Topp

James Cook University

Robyn Preston

Robyn Preston

Central Queensland University

Devaki Nambiar

Devaki Nambiar

The George Institute for Global Health

Marsha Orgill

Marsha Orgill

University of Cape Town

Emma Sacks

Emma Sacks

Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

Shiv Mathur

Shiv Mathur

Rajasthan University of Health Sciences

Sharon Low

Sharon Low

Public Health Practitioner/Researcher

Sharon Low is a Mentor as part of the Women Mentorship program.

Lyn Macarayan

Harvard University, Health Systems Global

"Being able to work with someone who has so much passion and desire to learn more about health policy and systems research is a very exciting part of the experience as an HSG mentor. I was inspired to meet my mentee who has so much energy and creativity on how we can innovate and even revolutionize health systems more."

Robert Marten

Robert Marten

Alliance for Health Policy and Systems Research, World Health Organization

"Guiding someone through the publishing process and helping them think through the steps to improve their submission, work with their co-authors, and ultimately submit is exciting!"

Ligia Paina

Ligia Paina

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health

"I loved meeting a new colleague, learning about her topic, and seeing the paper improve over the short time that we worked together."

Kerry Scott

Kerry Scott

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health/Independent researcher

"It was a pleasure to connect with another researcher and learn from her work."

Seye Abimbola

Seye Abimbola

University of Sydney School of Public Health

"Helping the mentee figure out the policy 'narrative' of their manuscript, and connecting them to the literature that helped them craft that narrative."

Lal B. Rawal

Lal B. Rawal

Central Queensland University

Lal B Rawal is a Mentor as part of the Women Mentorship program.

Salla Atkins

Salla Atkins

Faculty of Social Sciences, Tampere University and Department of Global Public Health, Karolinska Institutet

"The most exciting aspect of this experience was the enthusiasm and dedication that the mentee gave towards their personal project. It was fantastic to see them grow, and to connect with someone very far with whom to share experience."

Katrina Hann

Katrina Hann

Sustainable Health Systems, Sierra Leone

Katrina Hann is a Mentor as part of the Women Mentorship program.

Judith Daire

Judith Daire

Curtin University, School of Public Health

"Working with someone I have never met was exciting for me because it got to consider the basics of establishing trust and commitment in pursuing a common goal."

Nasreen Jessani

Nasreen Jessani

Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health; Stellenbosch University Centre for Evidence-Based Health Care and Africa Centre for Evidence at University of Johannesburg

"To work with a young emerging female researcher who wouldn’t otherwise have the opportunity to publish was the best part of the program."

Edna Nyanchama Bosire

Edna Nyanchama Bosire

Developmental Pathways for Health Research Unit (DPHRU), School of Clinical Medicine, University of the Witwatersrand

"I was so excited to not only mentor but also learn from my mentee. The mentorship process enhanced my skills in coaching, counselling, listening and modelling. It was exciting for me to see how my mentee grew in writing every day."

Karen Grepin

Karen Grepin

University of Hong Kong

Karen Grepin is a Mentor as part of the Women Mentorship program.

Mohammed Alkhaldi

Mohammed Alkhaldi

Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute, Council on Health Research for Development and McGill University

"Bringing new knowledge, expertise, models, methods, and skills... [and] open constructive and fruitful discussions and exchanges [is what I have found] most exciting [about] the mentorship experience."

Lisa Hirschhorn

Lisa Hirschhorn

Northwestern University Feinberg Medical School

"Making a connection with an emerging researcher from Nigeria and learn about their area of work" has been the most exciting aspect of this program.

Steph Topp

Steph Topp

James Cook University

"There is a generation of brilliant, motivated and above all knowledgeable early-career professional women out there whose insights in their own health systems ought to be a matter of public record. Helping remove the barriers that these early-career researchers experience in getting their work into the public domain, and in the process building a platform for their own professional development and recognition is enormously exciting."

Robyn Preston

Robyn Preston

Central Queensland University

"Engaging with a researcher on a topic I knew little about and learning more about her methodology" was the most exciting aspect of this program.

Devaki Nambiar

Devaki Nambiar

The George Institute for Global Health

"The opportunity to work with someone who is on another side who cares about inequality and social justice - that energy was electric! Getting to know not just her analysis, but the political economy and broader realities of her context, of a different country, was a great learning experience for me."

Marsha Orgill

Marsha Orgill

University of Cape Town

"Mentorship relationships are processes of co-learning, both mentees and mentors bring something valuable to the table, diffusion of knowledge then takes place, and I valued contributing to the HSG community in this way."

Emma Sacks

Emma Sacks

Johns Hopkins School of Public Health

"The findings from the study [written by the mentee] - related to infant polio immunization - were very important, and I'm thrilled that this mentorship allowed the study to be written up as a manuscript and shared more widely."

Shiv Mathur

Shiv Mathur

Rajasthan University of Health Sciences

"It was exciting to read the abstracts which acted as a window for me to look on concurrent research scenario in health sector involving women and perceive their enthusiasm."